‘To The Bone’ Works Hard To Do Justice To The Realities Of Anorexia [Review]

Addiction has long been one of Hollywood’s favorite muses. It makes for empowering, emotionally charged films about one of life’s most trying personal battles. Of course, the success and believability of these sorts of movies vary wildly: for every “Half Nelson” and “Trainspotting” there’s a “Thanks For Sharing” or “Flight” (which was fuelled by a fine performance, but in the end was little more than histrionics). Such movies are packed with personal demons, hallucinations and — in a lot of cases — triumph, a set of frames that veteran TV director Marti Noxon’s feature debut “To The Bone” fits nicely inside of.  The rest…

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Ranking The Best ‘Spider-Man’ Movie Characters

Martin Sheen has had his ups and downs, but throughout his career he has played the stern-but-loving father figure with grace and menace in equal dose. His Uncle Ben is no exception. Unlike the Ben in Raimi’s (superior) film, Sheen imbues the character with rough edges; he’s a man of principle who believes in the responsibility of good, but falls victim to the petty whims of anger. This, of course, is best exemplified in the scene where Ben, full of rage and righteousness, recounts to Peter the “moral obligation” of doing good — the embodiment of the difficulty to live up to your principles. Basically Sheen turns an iconic character into a living, breathing man, and Webb’s film is better for it.

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